At this stage of my life, I really love life in the slow lane, though not quite to the extent of my buddy who lives downstairs, who prefers the parking lot, so to speak. He meditates most of the time and doesn’t like to leave the village, if he can help it. I also meditate a lot, but I need to work, and I do like to travel sometimes.

Anyway, life in a little village where not much happens really appeals to me. As I writer, I need a situation where I can work undisturbed, and this is perfect. I can sit out on my balcony or at my desk and look out on some of the highest mountains in the world, surely one of the most beautiful views in the world.
The local people are delightful, friendly and helpful. Some of the taxi-walas are a notable pain, but if I have to go farther than the next village, I get someone else to pick me up who does it for a lot less money so no problem.

The climate here is good—not too hot in the summer and not so very cold in the winter. Due to climate change, winters are getting warmer, which really isn’t good. It would be better if it snowed a bit more. Anyway, I’m pretty comfortable with the weather most of the time.

It’s not a big village, but there are a few dozen shops that provide pretty much what we need on a daily basis. Most other items I can get from a nearby town. Of course, when I go to Delhi, I always take an extra bag to stock up on anything that isn’t available nearby, especially organic food.

As I mentioned in my previous blog post, it’s cheap to live here. I spend Rs.6,500 for rent and utilities, rs750 for phone and Internet, and maybe Rs7,000 or so for food, including milk from the neighbor’s cow that’s delivered to my door every morning. If I didn’t go organic and made do with everything from the local shop, it would be less than half that much. In any case, living here is no financial strain.

There are few things I miss, but not enough to do anything about them right now. I don’t have room for a refrigerator in my little kitchen, and I don’t have a proper kitchen sink, both of which I would love. But I make do without them and it’s fine. Incidentally, compared with my landlord’s kitchen, mine is super hi-tech! It used to be a storeroom with a rough concrete floor and unpainted walls, so I spent a few thousand rupees to paint and tile it, and to furnish it with the necessities. It’s not so convenient by Western standards, but I’m quite happy with the setup. It’s not like I spend my time rushing around.

I could easily afford a cook/housekeeper, but I like doing things for myself. It’s a simple life and I love it.

 

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7 Responses


  1. Sharbari on 13 Apr 2016

    Hi,

    Very inspiring post. How do we find places for rent in the villages in Himalayas?

    • JD Viharini on 06 Jul 2016

      Ask around. When I first arrived in my village, I stayed at an AirBNB place that I found online. It was nice, but too expensive for a long stay, so I started asking around. I saw I guy sitting in front of a guest house and mentioned I was looking for a flat to rent and he happened to have one at his house, which is like a little homestay. Just what I needed. I’m sure I could have found several other options, but this one worked. Before I started, I spent quite a bit of time researching different areas of the Himalayas to find an area that really appealed. Actually, there were lots of possibilities but for some reason this seemed like a particularly good place.

  2. D Bhaduri on 28 Mar 2015

    hi,
    enjoyed your opinion. i am also looking to find such a place away from the city, lot of greenery preferably in the mountains where the summer is also cool and one doesn’t need an AC, without any noise or other pollution and with basic comforts post retirement, that is in another 2 years.
    would you like to share a few such locations.

    • JD Viharini on 05 Apr 2015

      There are many places in Himachal Pradesh that fit your requirements pretty well. I’d recommend finding a base, maybe in the Kullu area, and then just start exploring until you find the place that feels right. Spend a few days in a village, ask around about places to rent and see what comes your way.

  3. sham on 28 May 2013

    SHAM on 01 Feb 2012

    YOU ARE BLESSED TO LIVE SUCH A PEACEFUL LIFE.
    I WISH I WOULD DO IT, SOMEDAY I WILL RETIRE IN THIS VILLAGE.
    PL. TEL ME THE NAME OF THIS VILLAGE
    THANKS

  4. SHAM on 01 Feb 2012

    YOU ARE BLESSED TO LIVE SUCH A PEACEFUL LIFE.
    I WISH I WOULD DO IT, SOMEDAY I WILL RETIRE IN THIS VILLAGE.
    PL. TEL ME THE NAME OF THIS VILLAGE
    THANKS AND PL. DO SEND AN E MAIL
    I LOVE TO HEAR FROM YOU MORE ABOUT THIS PLACE

  5. vj on 26 Dec 2011

    just came across your blog while searching for small remote himalian village while searching on google. I am Indian myself living in London for last 9 years.

    I am searching of nice little himalian village for inner peace where i am thinking to spend two months doing quite meditation and soul searching. I would be greatfull to you if you can let me know the name of your chosen spot. i mean name of the village where you currently live. i am not looking any luxeries just basing accomodation.

    Thanks for your help. send me reply back to vijay31077@gmail.com

    vijay.


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